2000 Sacagawea Dollar Mule Error

2000 Sacagawea Dollar Mule Error

Cowboys did you know that in May 2000, while looking through a roll of Sacagawea Dollars, collector Frank Wallis of Mountain Home, Arkansas made an astonishing discovery.  He found a coin with the reverse of a Sacagawea Dollar and the
Read More

U.S. arrests couple for allegedly laundering $4.5 bln in crypto tied to Bitfinex hack

WASHINGTON, Feb 8 (Reuters) - The FBI arrested a husband and wife on Tuesday morning, alleging they conspired to launder cryptocurrency stolen from the 2016 hack of virtual currency exchange Bitfinex, and said law enforcement has already seized
Read More
ERROR COIN Rare Lincoln penny sells for $372 online – do you have one in your spare change?

ERROR COIN Rare Lincoln penny sells for $372 online – do you have one in your spare change?

When it comes to the Lincoln cent, there are a few different designs of the coin.   The seller noted that 30% of the coin was off-center This includes the memorial cent, wheat ears, and reverse shield series. The
Read More

The Dollar’s Decline May Be About to Accelerate

January 17, 2022  – Precious metals markets enter this week’s trading with an opportunity to benefit from continued dollar weakness. Gold and silver prices rose last week as the U.S. dollar fell versus foreign currencies.
Read More
Rings Versus Clicks: Why You Should Listen To Your Coins

Rings Versus Clicks: Why You Should Listen To Your Coins

One of the biggest volume purchases in most coin shops is that of pre-1965 90% silver U.S. coinage. Depending on the prevailing winds of the bullion markets, the volume (both bought and sold) can be a proverbial trickle or metaphorical flood. The
Read More
Mint Error Coin Chronicles: Partial Collars

Mint Error Coin Chronicles: Partial Collars

Fascinating errors illustrate mechanical difficulties when seating blanks   Numismatic Guaranty Corporation (NGC) is one of the world’s leading authority on mint errors, a popular segment of numismatics. In Mint Error Coin
Read More
United States 1918 (P) Lincoln Cent

United States 1918 (P) Lincoln Cent

Description Lincoln cents were in short supply as the United States entered its second year of war in Europe. Increased wartime economic activity drove up demand for circulating coinage, resulting in larger mintages. The
Read More
Eisenhower Dollars: History, Values and Scarce Coins

Eisenhower Dollars: History, Values and Scarce Coins

Eisenhower dollars, issued from 1971 to 1978, were the first dollar coins issued since the Peace dollar series ended in 1935. Eisenhower dollar coins are also the only circulating cupronickel dollars that are the same size as classic silver
Read More
Classic US Coins: The Short-Lived Two Cent Piece

Classic US Coins: The Short-Lived Two Cent Piece


Read More
The Great U.S. Mint Silver Coin Swindle

The Great U.S. Mint Silver Coin Swindle

Most U.S. coin collectors know that the United States Mint continued to pump 1964-dated 90% silver dimes, quarters and half dollars into circulation through 1965 and into early 1966. The reasons for doing this were several, some of them
Read More
Metal detectorist unearths rare gold coins from Black Death period

Metal detectorist unearths rare gold coins from Black Death period

A metal detectorist in England has unearthed two rare gold coins that date to the mid-14th century, a time when Black Death was ravaging the country. Both medieval coins depict Edward III, who tried to
Read More
United States 1971-P Kennedy Half Dollar

United States 1971-P Kennedy Half Dollar

1971 was meant to mark a significant change in the life of the Kennedy half dollar.

Introduced in 1964 to honor the recently-assassinated president John F. Kennedy, the Kennedy half dollar replaced former United States Mint Chief Engraver John R. Sinnock’s design featuring Founding Father Benjamin Franklin that had been in use since 1948. And in the following year, the half dollar’s composition was changed from the 90% silver and 10% copper standard fineness of circulating subsidiary coinage to 40% silver and 60% copper–an alloy referred to as “silver-clad”. The silver-clad half dollar retained Gilroy Roberts’ bust of Kennedy on the obverse and Frank Gasparro’s heraldic eagle on the reverse.

A few years later, silver was eliminated from the denomination altogether by the bill authorizing the creation of the Eisenhower dollar (though that bill called for the production of silver-clad dollar coins to be sold to collectors). The Coinage Act of 1969, which called for the creation of a dollar coin honoring the late president and World War II general Dwight D. Eisenhower and removing silver from the Kennedy half, was attached as an amendment to the One Bank Holding Act of 1970. The law was signed by President Richard M. Nixon minutes before midnight on December 31, 1970; had he waited until after midnight, a pocket veto would have killed the bill.

A 25% nickel and 75% copper metallic composition known as copper-nickel clad was used for the half dollar for the first time in 1971. The composition was introduced for the dime and quarter in 1965. Roberts’ and Gasparro’s designs remained unchanged. So, too, did the size of the coin. The weight, however, was decreased from 11.5 to 11.3 grams.

Yet despite all the attention that Congress was giving to the denomination, use of the half dollar in daily transactions had declined significantly by the late 1960s. One factor was the perhaps predictable hoarding of Kennedy half dollars by an American public that held the late president in high esteem. And regardless of design, 90% silver half dollars were plucked from circulation for their bullion value beginning in the early-to-mid 1960s. The public hoarded the silver-clad coins too, though in the mid-to-late 1960s, the silver in each coin was worth less than 50 cents; PCGS claims that the silver-clad coins’ silver bullion value did not exceed face until 1974.

By 1971, half dollars were no longer a major part of most consumers’ lives and became silver (or silver and/or copper-nickel clad) curios squirreled away in drawers. 1970 Kennedy halves, the last of the silver-clad composition, were not struck for circulation but rather for inclusion only in Mint Sets. Vending machines didn’t accept half dollars, and many cashier’s tills no longer had space dedicated to the denomination.

The Mint would stop striking half dollars for circulation entirely in 2002.

But that was years down the road. In 1971, 155,164,000 business strike Kennedy halves were struck at the Philadelphia Mint, though no mint mark was applied to Philadelphia half dollars until 1980.

The 1971-P Kennedy Half Dollar in Today’s Market

The first date with the new copper-nickel clad composition is affordable and accessible for virtually all collectors.

Raw 1971 Kennedy halves are regularly offered on eBay for a few dollars or less. Half dollars dated 1971 can be purchased at face value if a collector is willing to dig through rolls. CoinWeek writer Josh McMorrow-Hernandez did just that in his August 2018 article, finding 355 of them (more than any other date) out of 2,000 half dollars purchased from a bank. The majority of the coins he found were copper-nickel clad, struck in the 1970s, and in average circulated condition.

Most surviving Mint State examples of the 1971-P Kennedy half dollar will grade between MS64 and MS65 if submitted to the grading services. A collector looking for an example in Gem Uncirculated grades or higher, certified MS-65 and MS-66, should be ready to spend $20 to $65.

Collectors seeking coins in the top end of the market, however, should be ready to spend more than $1,000.

The finest-known 1971 half dollars grade MS-67, with both NGC and PCGS certifying seven at that grade. The record public auction price for a certified 1971-P Kennedy half dollar was realized on November 11, 2018 (the 100th anniversary of the end of World War I, coincidentally) in a Heritage Auctions sale when an example certified MS-67 by NGC crossed the block for $1,560 USD.

But keep in mind, vast numbers of Mint State (and Mint Set) 1971 half dollars have yet to be submitted for grading.

Design of the Kennedy Half Dollar

Obverse:

The obverse of the Kennedy half dollar was designed by Gilroy Roberts, Chief Engraver of the United States Mint from July 22, 1948, to February 11, 1965. Roberts also designed President Kennedy’s inaugural medal, which served as the basis of the present design.

The central motif is an effigy of the 35th President of the United States, the late John Fitzgerald Kennedy. A war hero and (at the time) the youngest person ever elected president, Kennedy was inaugurated on January 20, 1961, and assassinated on November 22, 1963. The nation’s grief was such that Congress and the U.S. Mint rushed through a design change on the half dollar denomination to commemorate the bereaved president.

Atop the upper half of the rim is the inscription LIBERTY, with Kennedy’s hair covering the bottom portions of the letters “B”, “E”, and “R”. The date 1971 is cradled at the bottom of the coin, while the national motto IN GOD WE TRUST is inscribed in a straight line above the year but divided by the sharp truncation of Kennedy’s neck. Gilroy Roberts’ initials are located on the truncation line of Kennedy’s bust, above the “WE” on the bottom right side of the coin.

Reverse:

Roberts’ assistant (and soon-to-be replacement) Frank Gasparro designed the reverse. He based the heraldic eagle on the presidential coat of arms from the Seal of the President of the United States, which itself is based on the obverse of the Great Seal of the United States. The presidential seal in its current form was finalized by President Harry S. Truman in 1945, though the number of stars on the seal (and hence the coin) went from 48 to 50 as the states of Alaska and Hawaii entered the Union.

The eagle’s wings and legs are spread in four directions. The left talon (viewer’s right) holds a bunch of arrows, a symbol of war, while the right claw (viewer’s left) holds an olive branch, a symbol of peace. It is tradition to have the eagle face one side or the other relative to national circumstances at the time of striking; in this instance, the eagle faces towards the olive branch despite America’s involvement in Vietnam and other conflicts around the world.

Frank Gasparro’s initials (“FG”) are located between the eagle’s left leg and its tail feathers.

A Union shield covers the eagle’s breast. Vertical bars representing the 13 red and white stripes of the American flag run down most of its face, the stripes representing the original 13 colonies of the United States. The top of the shield (a horizontal band otherwise known in heraldry as a “chief”) features no stars. They are represented beneath the clouds in a space known as the “glory”. Nine stars are located in a row at the top. Four zigzag beneath the ribbon on the right side of the eagle’s head.

Immediately above the eagle’s head is a scroll featuring the motto E PLURIBUS UNUM. The design behind and above the eagle, which consists of 15 rays, nine stars, and a mass of clouds, is called a “glory” and is a common design element of both heraldry and an earlier period of numismatics.

The inscription UNITED STATES OF AMERICA runs clockwise along the top rim of the reverse, while the denomination HALF DOLLAR runs counterclockwise along the bottom. Dots are placed between the two inscriptions at both ends. Surrounding the eagle is a ring of 50 stars, representing the 50 states of the Union at the time of the coin’s production.

Edge:

The edge of the 1969-D Kennedy half dollar is reeded.

Designer(s):

Gilroy Roberts was the ninth Chief Engraver of the U.S. Mint, serving from 1948-1965. He is best remembered for his design of the Kennedy half dollar obverse.

Frank Gasparro was an American medalist and coin designer. He became Chief Engraver of the United States Mint on February 11, 1965, after Roberts’ work with the Franklin Mint caused the U.S. Mint to let Roberts go. Having served as an assistant engraver to Roberts for three years, he was the 10th Chief Engraver of the United States Mint until his retirement in 1981 (View Designer’s Profile).

Read More

United States 1971-P Kennedy Half Dollar

Read More

United States 1971-P Kennedy Half Dollar

Read More

Real Profits From Paper Errors

Chances are, at some point while paying with paper money you've handed someone a $10 or $20 bill and later realized you got less change than expected. Perhaps the retailer mistook your bill for a smaller one. Or maybe you were just shortchanged.
Read More
Web Notes

Web Notes

Web notes  are a type of United States currency named after the "web printing production" method of printing on continuous rolls of paper. There are several types of web printing production methods, including  offset ,  gravure
Read More
Maya Angelou and Sally Ride Will Be First Women on U.S. Quarters Coming in 2022

Maya Angelou and Sally Ride Will Be First Women on U.S. Quarters Coming in 2022

Susan B. Anthony dollar or the Sacagawea dollar (which largely replaced it). If you've payed close attention to American coinage, you may have also spotted Helen Keller on the Alabama State Quarter. However, these are the only three women on
Read More
Decoding A One Dollar Bill

Decoding A One Dollar Bill

The United States one dollar note contains a wealth of information about when and where that note was printed. Collectors can use this information to help understand the U.S. system of currency and to make collecting decisions. The Federal
Read More
Determining the Value and Price of Coins

Determining the Value and Price of Coins

Many factors go into determining the  price and value  of a particular coin. First of all, you must understand the difference between  price  and  value . To most people, these two terms are used interchangeably.
Read More

How to Find Rare Error Coins in Circulation

Finding  error coins  in your daily pocket change can be fun and profitable and it's very easy to do. Develop good coin-checking habits from the very beginning and you may locate error coins and  die varieties  that are
Read More
Bitcoin tops $59,000 as PayPal launches crypto checkout service

Bitcoin tops $59,000 as PayPal launches crypto checkout service

Lorem Ipsum is simply dummy text of the printing and typesetting industry. Lorem Ipsum has been the industry's standard dummy text ever since the 1500s, when an unknown printer took a galley of type and scrambled it to make a type specimen book.
Read More

What is a Cud Error on a Coin?

A cud on a coin is a damaged area resembling a blob on the surface of a coin. The cud is raised above the  field , and it obliterates the device or inscription where it appears. Cuds are the result of  die cracks  or
Read More
Tesla’s Bitcoin Announcement Turns Negative for Cryptocurrency Market

Tesla’s Bitcoin Announcement Turns Negative for Cryptocurrency Market

Elon Musk, CEO of Tesla,  announced  yesterday that cryptocurrency users can buy Tesla products through Bitcoin. While the news was positive for the adoption of BTC, the world’s largest cryptocurrency lost nearly 5% of its value in the
Read More
Coinbase fined $6.5 million over cryptocurrency trading claims

Coinbase fined $6.5 million over cryptocurrency trading claims

Coinbase  is paying the price for its earlier cryptocurrency trading practices.  Coindesk  and the  Wall Street Journal  say the Commodity Futures Trading Commission  has fined  Coinbase $6.5 million for
Read More
More results: 1 2 Next Page
TOP